Savoury pies

Ricotta-Pie-(4510)

Lately I have been feeling somewhat homesick, especially when my auntie sends me photos of what she’s cooking! Just kidding – keep those pics coming Zi! Now this doesn’t happen to me very often, but when it happens it happens. That’s life. Cooking traditional Maltese food helps me to invoke a feeling of cosiness and reminds me of home, especially during the winter months. I feel so happy in the kitchen, even when I’m tired and can’t be bothered to cook a feast. But as a concept Maltese food is not that complicated, so for today I’ve decided to share with you something which we like to cook on our little island: my version of Ricotta Pie. What’s great about this pie is that you can eat it warm in winter and cold in summer. I love it! For my Maltese readers this will be nothing new, but I hope you will still like it and appreciate this lady’s wish to write about home once in a while!

Torti-(4500)

So for basic shortcrust pastry I always use the following. I use ounces for this as the measurements in grams can be a bit tricky. The basic rule of thumb for shortcrust is that the amount of flour should be twice as much (by weight) as the amount of fat.

  • 8oz plain flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon of salt (optional)
  • 4 oz margerine or butter, cold from the fridge
  • around 6 to 8 teaspoons cold water

Mix the flour, baking powder and butter in a bowl, using your thumbs and second and third fingers. Make sure that the butter is cold. Be patient here; the butter should be rubbed into the flour in about 5 to 10 minutes, until it seems like breadcrumbs. Do not use your palms because you will make the mixture warm up. Remember that for this, the colder everything is the better. Add the water gradually as needed, but don’t overwork the pastry. Wrap the finished product in cling film and set aside in the fridge until you need it. I like to keep it there for at least an hour, but I would say 30 minutes is enough.

For the ricotta filling you need:

  • 500g Ricotta
  • 300g frozen peas
  • 1 large egg, beaten slightly
  • some pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon dried sage
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme
  • 1 onion, cooked lightly in olive oil or butter and cooled.

You won’t believe how easy this mixture is to make: just mix the ingredients in a bowl till all is combined. Don’t forget to preheat the oven to 180°C/356°F/Gas Mark 4.

To assemble the pie: divide the pastry into two and roll it out on a clean and floured surface, a few inches larger in size than your pie dish. With the help of your rolling pin, lift the pastry and place it on the bottom of the dish. Fill the pastry with the ricotta mixture, then roll out the second piece of pastry and place this on the top. Secure the edges with your fingers. If you have extra pastry, make something pretty like a star or a flour or a simple knot to put on the top layer. Prong with a fork, brush the top with some milk or a beaten egg yolk and sprinkle with some sesame seeds. Place in a preheated oven for around an hour, till it turns golden and beautiful. It’s the smell of home. Enjoy alone or serve it with a plain green salad and a glass of your favourite white.

Timpana-(4509)

Timpana-(4511)

For another idea you can also make Timpana. The pastry is the same, but with a Bolognese type filling, made with penne, minced beef, peas and tomato passata. There’s no recipe here, at least for the time being, but I’ve put up a photo to give you an idea. In my view you don’t have to follow a recipe to the letter; it’s only here as a guide. I love this recipe and I hope you will to.

Enjoy!

Rob x

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Very Chocolatey Chocolate Loaf Cake

Chocolate-Cake-II-(4536)

Please don’t tell me that I made a mistake. I purposely emphasised the extreme chocolate-ness of this cake because I really wanted to make it clear that this is serious chocoholic business. This loaf cake is definitely good but it’s not for everyone. It’s not that I want to discriminate – far from it! It’s just that it’s very dense. I would suggest serving it with something else, like for example some berries for some tartness to make up for the sweetness provided by the chocolate and sugar in the recipe. This cake could easily be a chocoholic’s dream. Oh and also: please don’t comment on the photo – I had some extra chocolate icing to spare and wanted to use it!

This recipe is taken from Nigella’s How to be a Domestic Goddess with minor variations. So for this gooey, moist cake you need:

  • 225g unsalted butter, softened
  • 200g dark brown sugar
  • 175g light brown sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100g dark chocolate, melted and slightly cooled
  • 200g plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 250ml boiling water

Preheat the oven to 190ºC/374ºF/Gas mark 5, and grease and line your loaf tin.

Whisk the butter and both sugars together till they form a creamy consistency, then add the eggs and vanilla extract and continue whisking.

Add the slightly cooled chocolate and fold it gently into the eggy mixture, trying not to overbeat. This cake should be dense so you don’t want a fluffy consistency here.

In a small bowl combine the plain flour and the baking powder, and add this to the cake batter, one spoon at a time and mix gently with the boiling water until the batter is smooth and somewhat liquid, but not too much.

Pour this into the lined loaf tin and bake for 30 minutes at 190ºC; then turn the oven to 170ºC/approx 340ºF/Gas mark 3 for 25 minutes. Always keep an eye on it to prevent any burns and check the cake with a skewer or sharp knife, although here you’re looking for a gooey cake so the knife should not come out squeaky clean.

And as always…enjoy!

Rob x

Penne with Chorizo

Penne-with-Chorizo-and-Creme-Fraiche-(4659)

These days some of my friends are making it very easy for me to decide what recipes to write about. Yesterday a friend told me that she was making some cupcakes and thought of me, which was very very nice of her, me thinks. Today I had a little chat with another friend of mine about the joys of pasta, and how it can be classified as comfort food. As a typical Maltese I enjoy a nice plate of pasta once in a while, not only because it is one of the easiest things to prepare, but because there’s nothing better than pasta with a sauce made from simple ingredients. The Italians serve pasta as a primo, which is as it should be. But unfortunately in general we (as in non-Italians and not as in Maltese please) have made the portions bigger and bigger.

Cooking with chorizo is one of my favourite things to do. It wasn’t common in recipe books at all but lately it’s becoming more and more popular. It’s cured and smoked, and it can be eaten as is, but it gives a great depth of flavour when incorporated into your cooking. It is very strong and salty so go easy with it, but be brave and try it. For those who are new to it (just like me a couple of months ago) here’s something you should consider – a recipe which I tried recently from James Tanner Takes 5. (You know how much I like this book so I won’t bore you again!) It’s quick and uncomplicated. Simple enough, but you will want a second helping. James’ recipe calls for penne, and I can see why. I used tagliatelle instead and if he were here he would probably tell you to use whatever you like. However if you like to eat bite-sized chunks of meat and pasta at one go, then it’s penne all the way!

A little note about the ingredients before you start. If like me you don’t have sherry vinegar in your pantry, try using some white wine vinegar instead, and please don’t panic when you see that this recipe needs whipping cream. You don’t need it…really. James suggests using half-fat crème fraiche instead and it works fine. Tried and tested. Don’t let it heat up too much though because it tends to curdle. James cooks with shallots, most probably because they will give you a delicate flavour which is needed against the chorizo. I must confess that I didn’t have those so I used one common onion. I could have tried using spring onions instead. Also you can adjust the pasta quantity depending on how many people you’re having over for lunch. The quantities below are James’. Serves 4.

  • 350g dried penne
  • 250g chorizo, cut into diagonal thin slices
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 shallots
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • 125ml whipping cream or half-fat crème fraiche
  1. Cook the penne according to the packet instructions.
  2. In the meantime, slice the chorizo, and heat the olive oil in a pan. Tip in the shallots or onion and soften over medium heat for around 2 minutes. Add the chorizo and crank up the heat until it starts to release some of it’s oil.
  3. Add the sherry vinegar and leave to cook for around another minute or so over high heat and stir to deglaze your pan. Pour in the cream or crème fraiche, but don’t boil it if you’re using the latter. Just let it heat up and remove at once from the heat. Season with some fresh ground pepper.
  4. Drain the pasta and add the sauce on top into warm individual bowls.

Enjoy with a glass of chilled white vino and eat it in the garden!

Rob x

Easy cupcakes

Cup-Cakes-(4524)

I’ve been really busy these past few weeks and haven’t had time to bake. After moving and a few other hassles, I went down with a small bout of fever. No time to think and definitely in no mood to work. My mind couldn’t stop thinking about what to do next though and this morning I remembered that I had this cupcake recipe in line for ages now. When I was young a cupcake-making day was always exciting, so for old-time’s sake here is one I found on Nigella Express (page 187). I didn’t follow through with the coloured cream though, since I had some leftover chocolate icing in the fridge and used that instead. Here’s the recipe.

  • 125g soft butter
  • 125g sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 125 plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/392ºF/Gas Mark 6. Line a 12-muffin tin with muffin papers of baking paper.
  2. In a bowl if mixing by hand, cream the butter and sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy and changes colour to a pale yellow.
  3. Add the eggs one at a time and continue beating. Fold the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and vanilla extract.
  4. Divide the batter evenly into the muffin papers and bake for 15-20 minutes or until the little cakes turn golden. Tip the cupcakes onto a wire rack and leave to cool. Cover with any icing you prefer.

So easy to make and perfect for these summer evenings, when you still feel the urge to bake but you know you won’t cope with the oven for very long. Enjoy!

Rob x

Moving day.

Click here for http://www.keepcalmandcarryon.com

I know that I have already said that I am moving house. Moving day/s (it could take a couple of days I guess) will be Monday. So I am writing this in my tiny living space which is currently home to numerous boxes, not with nostalgia, but with a mix of tiredness and excitement. We will have loads of help too and I will feed a small group of friends at the end of the day, though I haven’t decided yet what to cook. I’m looking forward to it and I do feel grateful and blessed. These have been hectic days and I think I need a holiday. What I really need though is a Keep Calm & Carry On poster! I hope to be back soon. In the meantime Keep Cooking…

Rob x

Tea time cakes Continued: Banana Bread

Nigella's-Banana-Bread-(4656)

I like to try two similar recipes using one base ingredient and compare tastes and textures. The reason is simple really: this happens because usually I have one ingredient I buy too much of. The idea for the cake in the previous post and this one here came from having a couple of unused fruit lying around.

The following is taken from Nigella’s How to be a Domestic Goddess, which as I think I have said before, it is a must for all home bakers to have. But I will not go into that again, don’t worry! What I will tell you now is that on page 33 there’s a recipe for Banana Bread. Nigella has adapted it from Jim Fobel’s Old-Fashioned Baking Book: Recipes from an American Childhood and it’s very similar to the first banana loaf recipe I wrote about. There’s some alcohol in it in the form of bourbon or dark rum as she suggests. I had neither on hand so I used some brandy. It is simple, delicious and ideal for sharing. You will end up with a heavier cake but adding the alcohol plumps up the sultanas and makes them tastier. You will need:

  • 100g sultanas
  • 75ml bourbon or dark rum (or brandy)
  • 175g plain flour
  • 2 teaspooons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt (optional)
  • 125g unsalted butter, softened
  • 150g caster sugar or soft brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • Around 300g (without the skin) very ripe bananas, mashed
  • 60g pecans or walnuts, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  1. Place the sultanas and the alcohol in a small pan over the heat. As soon as it starts to boil, remove from the heat and let it soak for around an hour or until the sultanas have absorbed most of the alcohol. Drain using a sieve.
  2. In the meantime preheat the oven to 170ºC/338ºF/Gas Mark 3 and grease and line a loaf tin (23 x 13 x 7cm).
  3. In a medium-sized bowl put the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt and stir everything together well.
  4. Now mix the melted butter and sugar in a large bowl and whisk together; then add the eggs one at a time and continue whisking.
  5. Add the mashed bananas, walnuts, drained sultanas and vanilla extract. Mix lightly and start pouring the flour mixture slowly. Add half and beat, then add the other half and beat again.
  6. Pour the completed cake batter into your loaf tin and bake in the middle of the oven for around 1 to 1¼ hours, always keeping an eye on it. When ready the skewer or knife used to check it shouldn’t come out clean because you want a gooey cake. Don’t worry because the cake will continue to cook when you take it out of the oven while cooling. Leave to cool for a while in the tin, then take it out on a rack. If you line the cake with overlapping baking paper (see my lemon cake from a while back) handling it will be super easy.

Nigella’s variation of this cake, which I still have to try would be to replace 25g of the plain flour with good quality cocoa powder and adding 100g of dark chocolate chunks or chocolate chips. I’m sure I will like it!

Enjoy!

Rob x

Tea time cakes: Banana Nut Loaf

Banana-Nut-Loaf-(4645)

A couple of months ago I wanted to bake something light and fluffy for tea. I didn’t want to make another chocolate cake; that would have been too boring, even for my self-confessed love of the stuff. So I flipped through the books and found two lovely cakes. I couldn’t choose between them and I tried them both. On two different days in case you ask. The only problem was that when J processed the photos for me I couldn’t remember what cakes they were and where I got them from. Eventually J was the one who did the identifying; nothing out of the ordinary really – it happens. I need to improve my note-keeping…

The following is a recipe which I had in my notes for more than ten years now. It’s a good recipe for Banana Nut Loaf. You can make it quickly if you have people coming over for tea on a Sunday, you can whip it up for yourself and your family, and leave it in the kitchen for anyone who might like something sweet in the afternoon. The original recipe calls for wholemeal self-raising flour but I tried it with half wholemeal and half white once, and it still worked well. If you use plain wholemeal, then mix two teaspoons of baking powder with the flour. The recipe below is close to the one in the book but with a slight variations. It yields one loaf cake.

  • 125g soft butter
  • 230g soft brown sugar, plus 1 extra tablespoon
  • 3 eggs
  • 225g wholemeal self-raising flour
  • 50g dessicated coconut, plus 2 extra tablespoons
  • 15og banana, mashed
  • 125ml milk
  • 40g walnuts, chopped
  • ½ teaspoon mixed spice
  1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/Gas Mark 4 and grease and line a loaf tin with baking paper. (Believe me, this will really keep the cake nice and moist so don’t skip the lining bit.)
  2. In a large bowl mix the softened butter, the 230g of the sugar, eggs, flour, 50g coconut, banana and milk. Whisk all the ingredients together but don’t over beat.
  3. Now spoon half of your cake batter into the loaf tin. In a small bowl use your hands to mix half the walnuts, mixed spice, the 1 extra tablespoon of sugar and the 2 extra tablespoons of coconut.
  4. Sprinkle half this mix on to the batter in your tin. Then carefully pour in the remaining cake batter. Smooth the surface with a spatula and add the remaining spice, nut and coconut mix on top.
  5. Bake the cake for around 1 hour, keeping an eye on it every now and then to make sure the surface doesn’t burn. If this happens cover it loosely with a piece of foil after 25-30 minutes. Check that the cake has cooked through by inserting a skewer or knife. It’s well worth the wait.

    Enjoy!

    Rob x

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